Is It Really THAT Easy?

It really grinds my gears when someone says “this job is easy.”

Really? How is it easy?

We have medical education to maintain, we have runs to make that require varying degrees of physicality and medical skill, protocols and guidelines to memorize, not to mention all the other paperwork we have to complete and forms to sign, narcotics to count and inventory, medical supplies to order and count, and lots of other stuff that can be quite complicated just because we’re dealing with bureaucracy.

But to oversimplify it down to just a job demeans the work to something that I think of as easy. I worked at a public pool for a summer, taking money, handing out tickets, and putting soft pretzels in an oven. THAT was easy. This requires so much more finesse and education to do. When I think of easy I think they could pick any Joe off the street, plug him in my position and he would do just fine. Needless to say, that’s not quite the case. I spent thousands of hours in clinicals, classrooms, studying for exams, taking exams, and when that was done I found myself doing MORE of that just to be able to practice.

We stand in our way of achieving that professional status some times, as equals amongst healthcare providers. I think demeaning ourselves in such a way as to say “it’s easy” is one of the ways holding us back. If it were easy, then everyone one would do it.

  • Memphise34a

    What does any of that have to do with easy? Any job is easy when you like your job and your co-workers like and do their jobs. Both boil down to an Adminstration and supervisors that support their employees.

    • Liking your job doesn’t necessarily make it easy. An engineer can like what
      he does but still not find it easy. I spent a summer working on fire
      sprinkler systems in college. Good coworkers, yes. Easy? Absolutely not. The
      education required to design/build those systems is out of this world. I
      spent 3 years in classrooms learning NFPA codes just to be able to touch one
      in real life.

      Same parallel in EMS. Good coworkers? Yes. Easy? Absolutely not. Paramedic
      school and subsequent experience afterwards was not easy, and maintaining
      levels of education and practicing medicine along with the bureaucracy
      medicine entails makes it complicated. You can be an expert in sprinkler
      systems but never in medicine, the moment every job that seems trivial and
      your brain goes to sleep is the moment you miss something big. Ask a doctor
      if they think medicine for them is easy.

      I like what I do and wish I could do it more right now (someone who actually
      MISSES work, surprise), and I like who I work with directly. My direct
      management is supportive, higher ups seem a bit out of touch but that’s
      expected since they don’t have day to day contact. It’s easy to forget where
      you came from if you don’t interact with it. As far as emotional well being
      and job satisfaction, yeah it does make coming to work easier, but it still
      doesn’t change that there is so much education and skill to paramedicine
      (and medicine in general) that an oversimplification or misstep or
      miscalculation at a bad time could lead to a bad outcome.

      Sent via DROID on Verizon Wireless

      —–Original message—–

  • Memphise34a

    What does any of that have to do with easy? Any job is easy when you like your job and your co-workers like and do their jobs. Both boil down to an Adminstration and supervisors that support their employees.

    • Liking your job doesn’t necessarily make it easy. An engineer can like what
      he does but still not find it easy. I spent a summer working on fire
      sprinkler systems in college. Good coworkers, yes. Easy? Absolutely not. The
      education required to design/build those systems is out of this world. I
      spent 3 years in classrooms learning NFPA codes just to be able to touch one
      in real life.

      Same parallel in EMS. Good coworkers? Yes. Easy? Absolutely not. Paramedic
      school and subsequent experience afterwards was not easy, and maintaining
      levels of education and practicing medicine along with the bureaucracy
      medicine entails makes it complicated. You can be an expert in sprinkler
      systems but never in medicine, the moment every job that seems trivial and
      your brain goes to sleep is the moment you miss something big. Ask a doctor
      if they think medicine for them is easy.

      I like what I do and wish I could do it more right now (someone who actually
      MISSES work, surprise), and I like who I work with directly. My direct
      management is supportive, higher ups seem a bit out of touch but that’s
      expected since they don’t have day to day contact. It’s easy to forget where
      you came from if you don’t interact with it. As far as emotional well being
      and job satisfaction, yeah it does make coming to work easier, but it still
      doesn’t change that there is so much education and skill to paramedicine
      (and medicine in general) that an oversimplification or misstep or
      miscalculation at a bad time could lead to a bad outcome.

      Sent via DROID on Verizon Wireless

      —–Original message—–

  • Yes – I agree. Thank you for bringing the topic up!
    Many jobs are ‘relatively’ easy – providing you have the experience and knowledge – but even they can ga awry and the drop of a pin. then you get those really dodgy/messy/full on jobs that determine whether you are a good medic or not.

  • Yes – I agree. Thank you for bringing the topic up!
    Many jobs are ‘relatively’ easy – providing you have the experience and knowledge – but even they can ga awry and the drop of a pin. then you get those really dodgy/messy/full on jobs that determine whether you are a good medic or not.