Action in Detroit and FDNY Falls Flat

So the Mayor of Detroit finally takes action against an inept and ineffective fire dept administration, is it too little, too late?

Hopefully not.

I don’t know who in their right mind would take on a fire department with so many problems as Detroit. Budget cuts, response problems on both the fire and EMS sides of the house, low morale, and the list goes on. My hat is off to the mayor for taking action that should have been taken years ago.

The issue in Detroit stemmed from a missing wallet that was stolen from a residence during a carbon monoxide call. This issue was supposedly “resolved” by the chief of their battalion, and no investigation into who stole it was made. This is unusual, considering how in my department if something was stolen there would be an investigation into who did it, or at least who had access to the item at the time. Apparently here it is narrowed down to 2 personnel, and one who was unsupervised and not performing a task. Much of the information regarding the specific who and where was redacted.

Now don’t get me wrong, I think that they resolved the issue appropriately from a house perspective, taking up a collection to pay for that driver’s license that had to be replaced and the money that was supposedly in it. However, the Chief should have done more to investigate beyond taking up a collection. I guess we can call this “Walletgate.”

Now, FDNY promoted a logistics chief over the current EMS chief, John Perrugia, in the wake of the Mayor’s unhappiness over the EMS response during the snow storm. They even added a bugle to the EMS chief position.

This is a little unusual, considering how ambulances are not snow plows. If FDNY really wants to criticize anyone over the response to the snow storm, they should complain about the Sanitation Department, who’s job during the snow storm was to clear the streets of snow. The fact that they did not perform this function is what kept ambulances from reaching their intended destinations.

One would think that FDNY would have a plan for such an eventuality, but I guess not. I was on an episode of EMS Garage where we spoke a lot of preparedness, and how FDNY and the City of New York have prepared so much for terrorism that they forgot about the natural disasters, and the same could be said about any emergency plan. We have forgotten about natural disasters and worry more about other people doing something.

This article was written by rstine

  • OA Medic

    Not only are they overprepared for terrorism while being under prepared for acts of nature, they are also underprepared for run of the mill muliple patient incidents, such as MVAs. It is still very obvious that they are a “fire department” in charge of and EMS company.

  • OA Medic

    Not only are they overprepared for terrorism while being under prepared for acts of nature, they are also underprepared for run of the mill muliple patient incidents, such as MVAs. It is still very obvious that they are a “fire department” in charge of and EMS company.

  • Anonymous

    Being born in Detroit I have a soft spot for the area and believe that the area has been on the down turn to get any worse. I feel that there is a lot of hope for Detroit and I am one Paramedic/ Filmmaker that will, if the opportunity arrises make sure I do my part to build it back up again!!

  • Being born in Detroit I have a soft spot for the area and believe that the area has been on the down turn to get any worse. I feel that there is a lot of hope for Detroit and I am one Paramedic/ Filmmaker that will, if the opportunity arrises make sure I do my part to build it back up again!!

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  • I would like to think that any action is better than none but I also have to wonder if it’s putting a band-aid over an evisceration. I really hope things improve in both cities overall. As you said, though, NY’s biggest problem was the sanitation department not doing their job so why blame the EMS? Unless the city plans to outfit their rigs with snowplows (which I wouldn’t put past them).

  • I would like to think that any action is better than none but I also have to wonder if it’s putting a band-aid over an evisceration. I really hope things improve in both cities overall. As you said, though, NY’s biggest problem was the sanitation department not doing their job so why blame the EMS? Unless the city plans to outfit their rigs with snowplows (which I wouldn’t put past them).