Things that make you go “ughhhh…”

Ever had a type of call, duty, or other part of your job you just don’t like doing? Find out what makes us go “ugh..”

This week I’m joined by Scott Kier, Matt Fults, and Justin Schorr as we shoot from the hip this week and talk about things that we do that we don’t like to. This is a re-recording from an episode that was recorded and erroneously destroyed (oops!). Apologies to Jim Hoffman from EMS Office Hours, who was unable to rejoin us this time around.

Jim Hoffman (@emssafe) EMS Office Hours

Scott Kier (@MedicSBK) EMS in the New Decade

Matt Fults (@mdfultsmedic) The iMedic

Justin Schorr (@thehappymedic) The Happy Medic

[powerpress]

This article was written by rstine

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  • Dragon_persuasion

    In my district there is a man whom weighs just under 1000lbs. He’s sort a frequent flier and a great guy. Our agency does not have a bariactric cot. When we go to his aid we have to call in mutual aid from the other aide of the state. Who takes there time. Literally 3hrs. On scene time. To more the guy two miles down the road. Insane but what happens when he has the big NO and were stuck waiting for he cot for three hours

    • Anonymous

      Like we said, that bariatric patients are a major drain on resources in all fields of healthcare. Big bodies, big treatments. If your patient arrests, do what you can, but if you have to wait 3 hours for transportation, the outlook looks grim. There are so many ways we can prevent this sort of problem… I was taught about personal health and nutrition in middle school through dedicated classes and our gym class. These days, gym is optional and health isn’t taught. And we wonder why teenage pregnancy, diseases, and obesity are running rampant in our society. An ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure.

  • Dragon_persuasion

    In my district there is a man whom weighs just under 1000lbs. He’s sort a frequent flier and a great guy. Our agency does not have a bariactric cot. When we go to his aid we have to call in mutual aid from the other aide of the state. Who takes there time. Literally 3hrs. On scene time. To more the guy two miles down the road. Insane but what happens when he has the big NO and were stuck waiting for he cot for three hours

    • Like we said, that bariatric patients are a major drain on resources in all fields of healthcare. Big bodies, big treatments. If your patient arrests, do what you can, but if you have to wait 3 hours for transportation, the outlook looks grim. There are so many ways we can prevent this sort of problem… I was taught about personal health and nutrition in middle school through dedicated classes and our gym class. These days, gym is optional and health isn’t taught. And we wonder why teenage pregnancy, diseases, and obesity are running rampant in our society. An ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure.